What Does Hess Law State?

Hess’s law states that the enthalpy change of a reaction is the same, whether the reaction takes place in one step or several steps.

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What is Hess Law?

Hess’s law is a statement in thermochemistry which states that the heat of reaction for a chemical process taking place in more than one step is equal to the sum of the heats of reaction for the intermediate steps. In other words, it doesn’t matter what order the reactants are combined, as long as they all end up being involved in the overall reaction.

The concept was first proposed by Hess in 1841, though it wasn’t until much later that scientists began to understand how and why it worked. In general, Hess’s law is only applicable when all reactants and products are in their standard states (i.e., have a pressure of 1 atm and a temperature of 25 degrees Celsius). When this is not the case, the standard enthalpy of reaction (\DeltaH_rxn) can be calculated using the following equation:

\DeltaH_rxn = \sum \nu \DeltaH^o_f(products) – \sum \nu \DeltaH^o_f(reactants)

where \nu is the stoichiometric coefficient for each species and \DeltaH^o_f is the standard enthalpy of formation.

The Origins of Hess Law

In 1839, a German chemist named Dr. Carl Wilhelm Scheele discovered that when two substances combine to form a third substance, the heat given off (or absorbed) is always the same, regardless of the order in which the reaction occurs. This discovery led to the development of what we now call Hess’s Law.

In simple terms, Hess’s Law states that the total enthalpy change for a chemical reaction is the same, no matter how many steps are involved in the reaction or what order the steps occur in. This “law” is actually more of a general scientific principle than a law in the traditional sense. Nevertheless, it provides a useful way to simplify complex calculations involving multiple reactions.

Hess’s Law can be applied to any type of chemical reaction, including those that occur in everyday life. For example, when you light a candle, the heat released by the burning wax is equal to the heat of combustion of the wax (the heat given off when it burns in oxygen), minus the heat required to melt the wax and vaporize it into gas.

How Hess Law Works

Hess’s law says that if a reaction can happen in more than one way, the overall enthalpy change for the reaction is the same, no matter which route the reaction takes.

In other words, the enthalpy change for a chemical reaction is independent of the pathway or steps taken to get from reactants to products. All that matters is the difference between the total enthalpies of reactants and products.

The Importance of Hess Law

Hess law is a fundamental principle of thermochemistry that states that the heat of a reaction is independent of the pathway or steps taken to reach the final products. In other words, whether a reaction occurs in one step or several steps, the total enthalpy change will be the same. This law is also sometimes referred to as the “heat of reaction law” or the “equivalence principle.”

The Importance of Hess Law
Hess law is important because it allows chemists to calculate the heat of a reaction from data that may not be readily available. For example, if you want to know the heat of formation of water (H2O), you could measure it directly. However, it is also possible to calculate H2O’s heat of formation by adding together the heat of reactions for various pathways that all lead to the formation of water.

In addition, Hess law can be used to determine the enthalpy change for an overall reaction when only some of the individual steps in that reaction are known. This is particularly useful in cases where a direct measurement of the desired enthalpy change would be difficult or impossible.

The Significance of Hess Law

Hess law is significant because it allows us to determine the enthalpy change of a reaction (ΔH) from the enthalpy changes of other reactions. This is useful because, in many cases, it is easier to measure the enthalpy change of a reaction than it is to measure the enthalpy change of the reaction of interest. Hess law therefore allows us to indirectly determine the desired enthalpy change.

The Applications of Hess Law

Hess law, also known as the “heat of reaction” law, states that the heat of reaction for a chemical process is independent of how that process takes place. In other words, the total heat change for a chemical reaction will be the same, regardless of whether the reaction occurs in one step or multiple steps. This law is useful for predicting the heat change for a reaction that cannot be directly measured.

The applications of Hess law are particularly useful in cases where a reaction is taking place in multiple steps, or when an overall chemical reaction is taking place, but the individual steps cannot be measured. In order to use Hess law to calculate the heat change for a chemical process, simply add up the heat changes for each individual step in the process. This will give you the total heat change for the overall process.

In addition to calculating heat changes, Hess law can also be used to determine enthalpies of formation, which is the amount of heat required to form one mole of a substance from its elemental components. Enthalpies of formation can be measured directly, or they can be calculated using Hess law. To calculate an enthalpy of formation using Hess law, simply add up the enthalpies of all the individual steps in the formation process.

Hess law is an important tool for chemists and engineers as it allows them to predict and calculate unknown values related to chemical processes. This information can then be used to optimize those processes for maximum efficiency.

The Benefits of Hess Law

Though it may not seem like it, Hess law is actually very important in the Chemistry world. In fact, Hess law is so important that without it, a lot of the work that modern chemists do would not be possible. Read on to learn about the benefits of Hess law and how this simple equation can be used to make calculations that would otherwise be impossible.

Hess law states that “the heat of reaction for a process taking place in one step is equal to the heat of reaction for the process taking place in a series of steps.” In other words, Hess law allows chemists to calculate the heat of reaction for a chemical process by breaking it down into smaller steps.

One of the most important applications of Hess law is its use in calorimetry. Calorimetry is the study of heat transfer and often involves measuring the heat given off or absorbed by a chemical reaction. By breaking a reaction down into smaller steps, chemists can use Hess law to determine the overall heat given off or absorbed by the reaction as a whole.

Another important application of Hess law is its use in determining enthalpy changes for reactions that do not occur under standard conditions. Enthalpy is a measure of heat change that takes into account both the internal energy change and any work done by the system during a reaction. Standard enthalpy change, or ΔH⁰, is defined as enthalpy change under standard conditions (1 atm pressure and 25 degrees Celsius). If a reaction does not occur under standard conditions, however, its ΔH⁰ value cannot be directly measured and must be calculated using Hess law.

In summary, Hess law is an important tool that allows chemists to make calculations that would otherwise be impossible. By breaking down complex reactions into smaller steps, chemists can use Hess law to determine ΔH⁰ values for reactions that do not occur under standard conditions and to measure heats of reactions using calorimetry.

The Advantages of Hess Law

Hess law, also known as the heat of reaction or the Hess-Marcus law, states that the heat of reaction for a process that occurs in multiple steps is equal to the sum of the heat of reactions for the individual steps. This law was first put forth by German chemist Gilbert N. Lewis in 1884, but it was German-born physical chemist Peter Hess who gave the law its name. The advantage of Hess law is that it allows chemists to predict the heat of reaction for a process without having to measure it directly.

The Disadvantages of Hess Law

Hess law has several disadvantages. First, it can be difficult to determine the exact enthalpy change for a reaction. Second, Hess law does not always hold true for every reaction. Finally, some reactions are too complex to be explained by Hess law.

The Limitations of Hess Law

Hess law is a thermodynamic principle that states that the heat of reaction is the same, regardless of the path taken. In other words, it does not matter how a reaction occurs, the overall heat change will be the same.

Hess law has several limitations. First, it only applies to reactions that occur at constant pressure. Second, it only applies to reactions that occur in a closed system. Third, it only applies to endothermic reactions (reactions that absorb heat).

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