What Is The Lemon Law In Florida?

The lemon law in Florida is designed to protect consumers who purchase new vehicles that turn out to be lemons. If your new car turns out to be a lemon, you may be entitled to a refund or replacement vehicle.

Checkout this video:

What is the lemon law in Florida?

The term “lemon” is used informally to describe a new motor vehicle that is defective beyond repair, or a used vehicle that consistently has unresolved repairs. Formal lemon laws vary by state, but generally speaking, they provide protection for consumers who purchase or lease new motor vehicles.

In order to be considered a lemon under Florida law, a new or used motor vehicle must have a nonconformity that:
-substantially impairs the use, value or safety of the car;
-is covered by the warranty; and
-has not been repaired after a reasonable number of attempts.

If your car meets these criteria, you may be entitled to a refund or replacement vehicle under Florida’s lemon law.

What does the lemon law in Florida cover?

The lemon law in Florida protects consumers who have purchased or leased a new motor vehicle that has a serious defect that substantially impairs the use, value, or safety of the vehicle.

To be covered under the lemon law, the buyer must notify the manufacturer or dealer of the problem in writing and give them a reasonable time to repair it. If the problem is not resolved after a reasonable number of attempts, the buyer may be entitled to a refund or a new vehicle.

The lemon law does not cover used vehicles, motorcycles, recreational vehicles, or vehicles that are leased for more than 18 months.

What are the requirements for the lemon law in Florida?

In order for a consumer to qualify for protection under the Florida Lemon Law, the consumer must have purchased or leased a new motor vehicle primarily for personal, family or household use. Secondly, the non-conformity (defect or condition which substantially impairs the use, value or safety of the vehicle) must be reported to the manufacturer, its agent or its authorized dealer during the period of coverage. The lemon law in Florida covers any new motor vehicle that is still covered under an original manufacturer’s warranty when the non-conformity is first reported.

There are two ways to qualify for protection under Florida’s lemon law. The first way is if your vehicle has been subject to repair four or more times for the same defect and it is still not working. If this is the case, you can request that the manufacturer either replace your vehicle with a new one or give you a refund. The second way to qualify is if your car has been out of service by reason of repair for a cumulative total of 30 days or more within a 12 month period. If this is the case and your car is still not fixed, you can also request that the manufacturer either replace your vehicle with a new one or give you a refund.

It should be noted that in order to receive a replacement vehicle or refund, you must notify the manufacturer of your intention in writing and allow them an opportunity to repair the defect(s). You may also be required to submit supporting documentation, such as repair orders and/or physician’s statements verifying that you are unable to use your car due to a defect which substantially impairs its use, value or safety.

How does the lemon law in Florida work?

In order to even be covered by the lemon law in Florida, the issue with your new or leased vehicle must arise within the first 2 years or 24,000 miles (whichever occurs first) AND you must have attempted to fix the problem(s) a reasonable number of times (at least 3 times for the same problem, or 4-5 times for different problems). If your vehicle still doesn’t work after all those repair attempts, then you may be able to claim a refund or replacement under Florida’s lemon law.

What are the benefits of the lemon law in Florida?

The lemon law in Florida is designed to protect consumers who purchase defective vehicles. Under the law, manufacturers are required to repair or replace defective vehicles, or provide a refund to the consumer. The lemon law also provides for a warranty extension on qualifying vehicles. If you believe you have purchased a lemon in Florida, you may be entitled to relief under the law.

What are the drawbacks of the lemon law in Florida?

The lemon law in Florida has some drawbacks. For one, it only applies to vehicles that are leased or purchased for personal, family, or household use. It does not apply to vehicles that are used for business purposes. Additionally, the lemon law does not cover used vehicles or vehicles that are bought “as is.” Finally, the lemon law has a limited warranty period of 24 months or 24,000 miles, whichever comes first. After that, the manufacturer is no longer obligated to replace or refund the vehicle.

How do I know if I qualify for the lemon law in Florida?

There are a few qualifications that must be met in order to qualify for the lemon law in Florida. First, the problem with your vehicle must substantially affect its use, value or safety. Additionally, you must have made at least two attempts to repair the issue or had the vehicle in the shop for 30 days or more.

If your vehicle meets these qualifications and you still cannot get it repaired, you may be eligible for a refund or replacement under the lemon law in Florida. To learn more about your rights and how to file a claim, contact a lemon law attorney in Florida.

What should I do if I think I have a lemon in Florida?

The first thing you should do if you think you have a lemon in Florida is to contact the manufacturer or dealer and explain the problem. You may be able to get the problem resolved without going through the lemon law process.

If you are not able to resolve the problem and you believe your vehicle qualifies as a lemon under Florida’s lemon law, you should contact an experienced lemon law attorney. An attorney can help you navigate the process and protect your rights.

How can I get help with the lemon law in Florida?

The lemon law in Florida is there to protect consumers who have purchased a car that has chronic issues and doesn’t seem to be getting any better despite multiple repair attempts. If you think you may have a lemon on your hands, the first step is to contact the manufacturer and start a formal complaint. If they are unable to help you, you can reach out to the Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services for assistance. An attorney specializing in lemon law cases may also be able to help you get compensated for your troubles.

What are some common myths about the lemon law in Florida?

There are a few common myths about the lemon law in Florida, so it’s important to understand your rights before you purchase a new or used vehicle.

First, the lemon law does not protect against all defects. In order to be covered, the problem must substantially affect the use, value or safety of the vehicle and must occur during the warranty period.

Second, you do not have to give the dealer a certain number of chances to fix the problem before you can seek recourse under the lemon law. However, it is important to keep detailed records of all attempts to repair the defect, as well as any conversations with the dealer or manufacturer.

Third, you are not required to use the dealer’s Repair Assistance Program in order to be eligible for a refund or replacement under the lemon law. However, if you do use the program, you may be entitled to additional compensation for your inconvenience.

Finally, there is no minimum number of days that a vehicle must be out of service in order for it to be considered a lemon. The length of time may vary depending on the severity of the defect and whether it can be repaired in a reasonable amount of time.

If you think you may have purchased a lemon, contact an experienced attorney who can help you understand your rights and options under Florida’s lemon law.

Scroll to Top